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Kingfisher Manor Vancouver Island BC
Wildlife - Kingfisher Manor Vancouver Island BC Wildlife - Kingfisher Manor Vancouver Island BC
The wildlife around Kingfisher Manor is spectacular. From the floor to celing windows overlooking the water, eagles fishing or seals playing in the currents are always visible.

Collected below are some of the most common wildlife seen around Kingfisher Manor with links to more information.

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Wildlife - Kingfisher Manor Vancouver Island BC

Bald Eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus)
A bird of prey originating in North America. The species was on the brink of extinction late in the 20th century but now has a stable population and is in the process of being removed from the U.S. federal government's list of endangered species.

The bird gets both its common and scientific names from the distinctive appearance of the adult's head. Bald in the English name refers to the white head feathers, and the scientific name is derived from Haliaeetus, the New Latin for "sea eagle," (from the Greek haliaetos) and leucocephalus, the Greek for "white head," from leukos ("white") and kephale ("head").

Cormorants are medium-to-large seabirds. The majority, including all Northern Hemisphere species, have mainly dark plumagel. The bill is long, thin, and sharply hooked.

All are fish-eaters, dining on small eels, fish, and even water snakes. They dive from the surface, though many species make a characteristic half-jump as they dive, presumably to give themselves a more streamlined entry into the water.

Cormorants are colonial nesters, using trees, rocky islets, or cliffs.

Otters are aquatic or marine carnivorous mammals, members of the large and diverse family Mustelidae.

All otters have long, slim, streamlined bodies of extraordinary grace and flexibility, and short limbs; in most cases the paws are webbed. Most have sharp claws to grasp prey.

The Harbor Seal or Common seal (Phoca vitulina) is a true seal of the Northern Hemisphere. Having the widest range of all pinnipeds, Harbor seals are found in coastal waters of the northern Atlantic and Pacific Oceans as well as those of the Baltic and North Seas.

The orca (Orcinus orca) is the largest member of the oceanic dolphin family. It is the second-most widely distributed mammal on Earth (after humans) and is found in all the world's oceans. It is also a versatile predator, eating fish, turtles, birds, seals, sharks and even other juvenile and small cetaceans. This puts the orca at the pinnacle of the marine food chain. The orca also attacks whales, in particular gray whales.

The name "killer whale" reflects the animal's reputation as a magnificent and fearsome sea mammal that goes as far back as Pliny the Elder's description of the species. Today it is recognized that the orca is neither a whale (except in the broad sense that all cetaceans are whales) nor a danger to humans.

Salmon is the common name for several species of fish of the family Salmonidae. Several other fish in the family are called trout. Salmon live in both the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans, as well as the Great Lakes and other land locked lakes. The Kamchatka Peninsula, in the Russian Far East, contains the world's greatest salmon sanctuary.

The Dungeness crab is a type of crab that inhabits eelgrass beds and water bottoms from the Aleutian Islands in Alaska to Santa Cruz, California. They are named after Dungeness, Washington, a town now known as Old Town, Washington or Old Town Dungeness, Washington, which is located approximately five miles north of Sequim.

They measure as much as 25 cm (10 inches) in some areas off the coast of Washington, but typically are under 20 cm (8 inches). They are a popular delicacy, and are the most commercially important crab in the Pacific Northwest.

The Red Rock Crab, a large crab found locally in shallow water under seaweed and rocks. Found on sandy, silty, and rocky beaches. Carapace is brick red and fan shaped; heavy claws tipped black. Hard carapace protects the head and thorax while locomotion is accomplished by four pairs of walking legs and one pair of pinchers. Sheds shell and creates new larger one as the animal grows. Up to 7 inches across the carapace.

Sea stars or starfish are marine invertebrates belonging to phylum Echinodermata, class Asteroidea. The names sea star and starfish are also used for the closely related brittle stars, which make up the class Ophiuroidea. They exhibit a superficially radial symmetry. Starfish typically have five or more "arms" which radiate from an indistinct disk (pentaradial symmetry). In fact, their evolutionary ancestors are believed to have had bilateral symmetry, and sea stars do have some remnant of this body structure.

These Lions Mane Nudibranchs are jelly-bodied snails. The adult form is without a shell or operculum (a bony plate covering the opening of the shell, when the body is withdrawn).

The word "nudibranch" comes from Latin nudus meaning "naked", and Greek branchia meaning "gills". The name is appropriate since the dorids (infraclass Anthobranchia) breathe through a branchial plume of bushy extremities on their back, rather than using gills. By contrast, on the back of the aeolids in infraclass Cladobranchia there are three brightly colored sets of tentacles called cerata.